Major General Jon A. Jensen said the deployment of more than 700 National Guard members on Friday was the “largest law enforcement operation in Minnesota history,” but “it was not enough.”

Stay In Touch For Latest Updates On Our WhatsApp And Telegram Group[Click On The Link Below]
Telegram | WhatsApp

Jensen said they now have to have 2,500 personnel mobilized by 12 p.m. on Saturday – which is an increase from the 1,700 total personnel the National Guard said would be on the ground this morning in a tweet.

A group of protesters surrounded several National Guard vehicles that were driving on Lake Street towards the blockade under the Hiawatha Light Rail station and forced them to reverse out in Minneapolis, Minn., on Friday, May 29, 2020. A peaceful protests turned increasingly violent in the aftermath the death of George Floyd during an arrest. Mayor Jacob Frey ordered a citywide curfew at 8 p.m. local time, beginning on Friday. (Renee Jones Schneider/Star Tribune via AP)

“The governor just announced the full mobilization of the Minnesota National Guard for the first time since World War II. What does that mean? It means we’re all in,” Jensen said.
Jensen said the state is also in the process of requesting “national level resources.” He said he has had conversations with the Secretary of Defense and the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

Derek Chauvin is being detained at Ramsey County Jail in St. Paul
From CNN’s Eric Fiegel

Ramsey County Sheriff’s Office via AP
Ramsey County Sheriff’s Office via AP
Derek Chauvin is being held at the Ramsey County Jail in St. Paul, according to Bureau of Criminal Apprehension spokesperson Jill Oliveira.

When asked why Chauvin was not being held in Hennepin County, where the death of George Floyd occurred, Oliveira told CNN, “The BCA communicated with the Hennepin County Sheriff’s Office, which was dealing with potential threats to their facilities at the time of the arrest, they directed us to book him into the Ramsey County jail.”

Chauvin has been charged with charged with murder and manslaughter following the death of Floyd. Documents show that his bail was set at $500,000.

ATLANTA, GA – MAY 29: A man holds a Black Lives Matter sign as a police car burns during a protest on May 29, 2020 in Atlanta, Georgia. Demonstrations are being held across the US after George Floyd died in police custody on May 25th in Minneapolis, Minnesota. (Photo by Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images)

Mobilization of Minnesota State Patrol is unlike anything seen in the state since 1929, colonel says
State patrol officers block a road in Minneapolis on May 29.
State patrol officers block a road in Minneapolis on May 29. Scott Olson/Getty Images
Col. Matt Langer said the demonstrations in St. Paul and Minneapolis over the last few days has forced the Minnesota State Patrol to mobilize personnel in a way unlike anything seen in more than 90 years in the state.

“We have done something we’ve never done in the history of our organization since 1929 in terms of the mobilization of our state troopers across Minnesota that have come to the metro area to do what we can, to get back to what we believe in as an organization as the Minnesota State Patrol, that we respect integrity, courage, honor and excellence. That’s who we are, and that’s who we believe Minnesotans are too,” Langer said.
Langer emphasized that his staff’s “job is to get out there, in the middle of the mission that we’re confronted with right now, to stop the criminal behavior that we have been seeing and to prevent the criminal behavior that we regretfully anticipate we will see tonight and into the near future.”

A protester is detained by police during a “Justice 4 George Floyd” demonstration over the death of George Floyd, a black man who died after a white policeman kneeled on his neck for several minutes in Houston, Texas on May 29, 2020. – Demonstrations are being held across the US after George Floyd died in police custody on May 25. (Photo by Mark Felix / AFP) (Photo by MARK FELIX/AFP /AFP via Getty Images)

Most protesters are not Minneapolis or St. Paul residents, mayors say
From CNN’s Elise Hammond

Mayor Jacob Frey said the people who are coming to Minneapolis to protest are not residents and are “coming in largely from outside the city.”

“Our Minneapolis residents are scared and rightfully so. We’ve seen longterm institutional businesses overridden. We’ve seen community institutions set on fire. And I want to be very, very clear. The people that are doing this are not Minneapolis residents,” he said at a news briefing on Saturday.
He said the protests earlier this week that were mostly peaceful and were largely attended by those who lived in the city, but “the dynamic has changed.”

“Gradually that shift was made and we saw more and more people coming from outside of the city. We saw more and more people looking to cause violence in our communities, and I have to say, it is not acceptable,” Frey said.

“This is no longer about verbal expression. This is about violence and we need to make sure that it stops,” he added.

St. Paul Mayor Melvin Carter said everyone who was arrested in his city last night was from outside the state.

“What we are seeing right now is a group of people who are not from here,” he said.

There were roughly 20 arrests made in St. Paul last night, mostly for burglary, and roughly the same number of arrests in Minneapolis for curfew violations and destruction of property, said John Harrington, commissioner of the Minnesota Department of Public Safety.

Minneapolis mayor: “This is no longer about verbal expression. This is about violence

Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey rebuked the demonstrations last night in his city and called for the destruction and violence to stop.

“This is no longer about verbal expression. This is about violence and we need to make sure that it stops. We’re in the middle of a pandemic right now. We have two crises that are sandwiched on top of one another. In order to make sure that we continue to have the necessary community institutions, we need to make sure that our businesses are protected, that they are safe, and that they are secure,” Frey said at a news conference this morning.

In this May 29, 2020, photo, a check-cashing business burns during protests in Minneapolis. Protests continued following the death of George Floyd, who died after being restrained by Minneapolis police officers on Memorial Day. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

Protests in Minneapolis are “no longer, in any way, about the murder of George Floyd,” governor says
From CNN’s Elise Hammond

Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz said “the situation in Minneapolis is no longer in any way about the murder of George Floyd” at a news briefing on Saturday morning.

“It is about attacking civil society, instilling fear and disrupting our great cities,” he added.
He said violent protests Friday night were a “mockery of pretending this is about George Floyd’s death or inequities or historical traumas to our communities of color.”

“Because our communities of color and our indigenous communities were out front fighting hand in hand to save businesses that took decades to build. Infrastructure and nonprofits that have served a struggling community were torn down and burned by people with no regard for what went into that,” Walz continued

innesota governor says “restoring civil order on the streets” is the top priority

Law enforcement officers faced improvised explosive devices and a “highly evolved and tightly controlled group of folks bent on adapting their tactics to make it as difficult as possible to maintain that order” last night in Minneapolis as protesters blanketed the city, Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz said at a news conference late this morning.

“I think what’s really important to recognize is the tactics and the approach that we have taken have evolved and need to evolve the same way. With a sensitivity to the legitimate rage and anger that came after what the world witnessed in the murder of George Floyd, and was manifested in a very healthy gathering of community to memorialize that on Tuesday night. Was still present to a certain degree on Wednesday. By Thursday, it was nearly gone, and last night is a mockery of pretending this is about George Floyd’s death or inequities or historical traumas to our communities of color,” Walz said.
Earlier Saturday morning: Walz held another news conference early this morning in response to the unrest across the city, after a number of protesters ignored an 8 p.m. curfew set by the state government.

“This is the largest civilian deployment in Minnesota history that we have out there today,” Walz said then. “This is an operation that has never been done in Minnesota.”

Minnesota National Guard mobilizes more than 1,000 additional personnel on Saturday
The Minnesota National Guard is activating more than 1,000 additional personnel today, the group announced in a tweet Saturday morning.

This is addition to the 700 citizen soldiers and airmen who were on duty last night, according to the tweet.

“This represents the largest domestic deployment in the Minnesota’s National Guard’s 164-year history,” the tweet said.

Protesters clash with police in Lafayette Square Park in Washington on May 30.
Protesters clash with police in Lafayette Square Park in Washington on May 30. Alex Wong/Getty Images
In a Saturday morning tweet, President Trump said the protests in Lafayette Park in front of the White House on Friday had “little to do with the memory of George Floyd,” again providing no evidence to back up that claim, adding that demonstrators, “were just there to cause trouble.”

Trump alleged, without evidence, that protesters were, “professionally managed.” There is no indication that they were.

“Tonight, I understand, is MAGA NIGHT AT THE WHITE HOUSE???,” he wrote, without explaining what he meant by that.

They professionally managed so-called “protesters” at the White House had little to do with the memory of George Floyd. They were just there to cause trouble. The @SecretService handled them easily. Tonight, I understand, is MAGA NIGHT AT THE WHITE HOUSE???

Trump responds to White House protesters saying they would have been met with “vicious dogs”
From CNN’s Nikki Carvajal

A protester stands in front of police outside the White House in Washington on May 30.
A protester stands in front of police outside the White House in Washington on May 30. Eric Baradat/AFP via Getty Images
In a bizarre four-tweet thread, President Trump thanked the Secret Service for their handling of protests in Lafayette Park Friday night.

The President tweeted that the protesters “would have been greeted with the most vicious dogs, and most ominous weapons, I have ever seen,” had they breached the fence at the White House.

Trump also attacked DC mayor Muriel Bowser, claiming she “wouldn’t let the D.C. Police get involved.”

DC Police were on scene last night, in addition to several other agencies.

Protestors clash with Secret Service overnight outside the White House
From CNN’s Noah Broder, Dave Brooks, Jay McMichael, Jake Scheuer, Wayne Cross and Brian Todd

A protester holds his hands up as police officers keep demonstrators away from the White House in Washington on May 30.
A protester holds his hands up as police officers keep demonstrators away from the White House in Washington on May 30. Tom Brenner/Reuters
A group of protestors gathered in front of the White House overnight following the death of George Floyd at the hands of the Minneapolis police.

For more than five hours overnight, protestors confronted Secret Service officers at barriers in front of the White House. At times, the crowd removed the metal barriers and began pushing up against the riot shields and the Secret Service officers. The protestors pushed hard enough that some officers walked away with minor injuries.

At least one time, the agents responded to aggressive pushing and yelling by spraying pepper spray at the protestors.

Throughout the night protestors could be heard chanting their support for Floyd and their dislike of President Trump. At one point, a different camera crew was chased off by the protestors who could be seen trying to grab their equipment.

In addition to pushing and yelling, protestors could be seen throwing water bottles and other objects toward the line of officers. Those officers were continually bringing in new metal barriers throughout the night as protestors wrestled them away and tried to break through.

The protest began about 10 p.m. Friday night and the scene mostly quieted down by 3:30 a.m. Saturday.

The crowd thinned out and Secret Service Officers were able to expand their perimeter and barriers around Lafayette Park across from the White House. This was the second time that protestors gathered outside of the White House during the evening and early morning hours.

Here’s what happened before that: Protestors began gathering in Washington, DC, around 7 p.m. and the White House was initially locked down as the protestors began to move toward that location.

At 8 p.m. the Secret Service tweeted, “Secret Service personnel are currently assisting other law enforcement agencies during a demonstration in Lafayette Park. In the interest of public safety we encourage all to remain peaceful.”

The lockdown was lifted just before 8:30 p.m. as protestors marched to different parts of the city, before returning to the White House later in the evening and into the early morning.

Friday evening the Secret Service said it was “currently assisting other law enforcement agencies during a demonstration in Lafayette Park.”

A later request for comment about the overnight confrontations has not been answered. CNN also has an inquiry into the DC police department.

Portland mayor declares state of emergency, imposes curfew
From CNN’s Chuck Johnston and Artemis Moshtaghian

Protesters start a fire at a Chase bank in Portland, Oregon, on May 30.
Protesters start a fire at a Chase bank in Portland, Oregon, on May 30. Alex Milan Tracy/Sipa USA/AP
Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler has declared a state of emergency in light of the unrest in the city and an overnight curfew has been put into place, according to the mayor’s office.

The curfew is effective until 6 a.m. PT Saturday and resumes Saturday evening until Sunday morning, according to a tweet from Wheeler.

Wheeler urged his city’s residents early Saturday to halt the unrest over George Floyd’s death.

“Burning buildings with people inside, stealing from small and large businesses, threatening and harassing reporters,” he tweeted. “All in the middle of a pandemic where people have already lost everything. This isn’t calling for meaningful change in our communities, this is disgusting.”
Wheeler earlier tweeted that he was coming back to the city after being out of town because his mother was dying.

“ENOUGH. I had to leave Portland today because my mother is dying. I am with family to prepare for her final moments. This is hard, this is personal, but so is watching my city get destroyed. I’m coming back NOW. You will be hearing from me, @PortlandPolice, community leaders,” Wheeler said.

“Portland, this is NOT us. When you destroy our city, you are destroying our community. When you act in violence against each other, you are hurting all of us. How does this honor the legacy of George Floyd? Protest, speak truth, but don’t tear your city apart in the process.”

Curfew immediately in effect until 6:00 am today.

Resumes Saturday evening at 8:00 pm and lifts 6:00 am Sunday morning.

“Minnesotans are asking for and deserve confidence that we can respond to this crisis, and we will,” Walz tweeted Saturday morning.
Walz said the state is continuing to coordinate efforts at the state and local level to deal with protests that have broken out throughout Minnesota and in cities all across the US.

The governor ended his tweet with a plea: “I urge for peace at this time.”

Protesters who gathered in cities across the United States told CNN of their frustration over George Floyd’s death in Minneapolis.

“There needs to be change, officers need to be trained better,” one protester who was arrested in Atlanta told CNN’s Nick Valencia as he was being detained by police.

A lack of change and police reform are just some of the reasons people are enraged.

Chelsea Peterson, in Portland, Oregon, told CNN she demonstrated Friday night to “show my solidarity with my black brothers and sisters” as they face injustice.

“I protested for black men who are disproportionately arrested and convicted for crimes compared to their white counterparts. And I protested for black children that are shot over bags of Skittles,” she said.
Peterson said it was “not enough to simply share a post or use a hashtag” to insist that black lives matter.

“It was important for me as a white person to actually show up because it is our responsibility to dismantle the systems of oppression that we have created.”

In Minneapolis, Alicia Smith, a community organizer, told CNN: “There are no words in the English language that will convey the despair that I felt watching that man’s life leave his body and him scream out for his mother. I heard my son saying, ‘Mama, save me.’

“My kids are little boys, and my son asked me, ‘Am I going to live to be a grown-up?’” Smith said. “I’ve got to ruin his innocence and tell him how to exist as a young black boy in this country.”
Another protester, Craig Maxwell, in Charlotte, North Carolina, told CNN he turned out to demonstrate because he felt the need to step up his advocacy.

“I’ve been talking to several of my black friends the last day or two and hearing what they’re going through,” he said. “A lot of introspection and recognizing that I don’t put my money where my mouth is enough.

“Basically, I was there because they were there, if that makes sense.”

Mackenzie Slagle, in Oakland, California, said it was time for police brutality to stop.

“I don’t agree with breaking into all of the businesses, but I can understand the outrage after repeated incidents. We’ve peacefully protested all of those. It wasn’t until Minneapolis got violent they finally arrested a police officer.

“This is truly history in the fact that there’s actual action being taken against police brutality. I couldn’t stay silent and watch this happen again. I’m hoping this time our nation can see the severity of this climate.”

A man holds a Black Lives Matter sign as a police car burns in Atlanta on May 29.
A man holds a Black Lives Matter sign as a police car burns in Atlanta on May 29. Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images
Protesters took to the streets across the US on Friday night into early Saturday morning to express their concern and anger over the death of George Floyd while in police custody.

Some of the protests have been peaceful while others turned destructive.

Here are the cities where people gathered:

California: Los Angeles, Bakersfield, Sacramento, San Jose, Oakland, San Francisco

Colorado: Denver

Georgia: Atlanta

Illinois: Chicago

Iowa: Des Moines

Indiana: Indianapolis, Fort Wayne

Kentucky: Louisville (Related to the death of Breonna Taylor), Bowling Green

Louisiana: New Orleans

Nebraska: Lincoln

New York: New York City

Massachusetts: Boston

Michigan: Detroit

Minnesota: Minneapolis

Missouri: Kansas City

Nevada: Las Vegas

North Carolina: Charlotte

Ohio: Columbus, Cincinnati, Canton

Oregon: Portland

Texas: Dallas, Houston

Virginia: Richmond

Washington: Seattle

Wisconsin: Milwaukee

Washington, DC

The New York City Police Department told CNN that its officers arrested “dozens” during the protests that took place across the city.

“Most of the incidents/damage/arrests took place between Manhattan and Brooklyn,” the NYPD said, adding that the protests have now subsided.

Two Federal Protective Service officers shot in Oakland, one killed
From CNN’s Joe Sutton

Demonstrators climb atop a truck while blocking traffic on Interstate 880 in Oakland, California, on May 29.
Demonstrators climb atop a truck while blocking traffic on Interstate 880 in Oakland, California, on May 29. Noah Berger/AP
Two Federal Protective Service officers suffered gunshot wounds amid protests Friday night in Oakland, California, police said.

One of the officers died from his injury.

At least 7,500 protesters took to the streets of the city to demonstrate over the death of George Floyd, the Oakland Police Department told CNN.

Protesters caused damage across the city. There were reports of vandalism, theft of businesses, fires set and assaults on police officers, according to the police statement.

While arrests were made, police were unable to provide specifics.

“Two Federal Protective Services officers stationed at the Oakland Down Town Federal Building suffered gunshot wounds. Unfortunately, one succumbed to his injury,” the police department said.
Police are investigating.

The Federal Protective Service, which falls under the Department of Homeland Security, provides security and law enforcement services at US government facilities.

Protesters arrested in Lincoln, Nebraska
Protests over the death of George Floyd continued early Saturday morning in Lincoln, Nebraska, according to the police.

“The gathering at 25th and O is no longer a peaceful protest. Arrests have been made and will continue to be made for those who continue to break the law. Neighbors in the area please shelter in place,” the Lincoln Police Department tweeted.

Downtown Phoenix vandalized by protesters, say police
Protesters have left behind a trail of destruction in downtown Phoenix, Arizona, police said.

“Property throughout the downtown Phoenix area has been vandalized as some demonstrators engage in criminal behavior, breaking windows and doors to municipal and private business and destroy cars parked along the street,” Phoenix Police Department tweeted.
Phoenix is one of more than 20 cities across the US which saw protests on Friday night in the wake of George Floyd’s death.

“An Unlawful Assembly has been declared in the area around 6th Ave & Washington where demonstrators have been gathering,” Phoenix Police Department tweeted.

“Due to criminal activity and a current danger to our community, people must leave the area including sidewalks, private property or roadways.”

Police arrest nearly 200 in Houston protest
A protester is detained by police in Houston, on May 29.
A protester is detained by police in Houston, on May 29. Mark Felix/AFP/Getty Images
Nearly 200 people have been arrested in Houston, Texas, after protests Friday night.

Most will be charged with obstructing a roadway, according to a tweet from the Houston Police Department.

The department also said four of its officers sustained minor injuries and eight police vehicles were damaged.

Houston Police Officer’s Union President Joe Gamaldi earlier said officers had been hospitalized but did not say how many.

“Our officers who were attacked are in the hospital, patrol cars ruined, businesses damaged,” Gamaldi said in a tweet.
“This is not who we are as a City and as a community. We will protect your right to protest, but we will not allow our city to decay into chaos.”

Dozens arrested in Minneapolis as state plans to mobilize 1,700 National Guard soldiers

A check-cashing business burns during protests in Minneapolis on Friday.
A check-cashing business burns during protests in Minneapolis on Friday. John Minchillo/AP
About 50 people have been arrested as protests continue across Minneapolis.

More than 2,500 officers are helping to keep the peace, Minnesota Department of Public Safety Commissioner John Harrington told a news conference.

This is one of the largest civil police forces the state of Minnesota has ever seen, he said. But resources are still stretched thin, with thousands of protesters estimated to have turned out across the city.

“We recognized that we simply did not, even with the numbers that I’m talking about, have enough officers and personnel to meet all of those missions safely and successfully. We picked missions based on our capacity,” Harrington said.
Officers focused their efforts on downtown and the 5th Precinct area, he said.

A request has been made to substantially increase the number of National Guard officers available to bolster the city’s response, Harrington said.

Major General Jon Jensen, of the Minnesota National Guard, said he believed there could be more than 1,700 National Guard soldiers in the area by Sunday.

This would be the largest deployment in the state of Minnesota’s history.

“At the conclusion of tomorrow, I believe that we will have over 1,700 soldiers in support of the Department of Public Safety in the city of Minneapolis and the city of Saint Paul,” Jensen said.

Jensen noted that people may have heard that President Donald Trump directed the Pentagon to put units of the United States Army on alert for a possible operation in Minneapolis.

“While we were not consulted with as it relates to that, I do believe is a prudent move to provide other options available for the governor, if the governor elects to use those resources,” Jensen said.

Portland police declare a riot in the city and order protesters to disperse
In a statement on Twitter, Portland Police declared a riot is taking place in the city and ordered crowds to go home.

“Disperse now or you will be subject to gas, projectiles, and other means necessary for dispersal,” police said early on Saturday morning.
Portland is one of more than 20 cities across the US which saw protests on Friday night in the wake of George Floyd’s death.

Earlier Portland police said that there had been “significant vandalism” in the city related to the protests, as well as a shooting, although they didn’t provide any additional details.

“This event has been declared an unlawful assembly. If you do not go home now, force will be used to disperse you,” Portland police said on their official Twitter.
According to police, Portland’s Justice Center had been attacked by protesters and set on fire.

PPB has declared a riot. The following is closed to all traffic, pedestrians and vehicles: SW Naito Pkwy west to SW 13th Ave is closed from SW Lincoln north to NW Everett St. Disperse now or you will be subject to gas, projectiles, and other means necessary for dispersal.

Man shot and killed as protests continue in Detroit
From CNN’s Jennifer Henderson

A 19-year-old man was killed after shots were fired into a crowd of protesters in Detroit late Friday, the city’s police department said in a statement.

Police said the shots were fired by an unknown suspect in a gray Dodge Durango, with the victim later dying in hospital.

Detroit police cannot confirm if the victim was part of the protests, but the shooting happened downtown where the protests were taking place.

Earlier, Detroit Police Chief James Craig said a person had been arrested after trying to run an officer over.

“I will not stand by and let a small minority, criminals, come in here, attack our officers and make our community unsafe. Just know, we are not going to tolerate it,” Craig said.

Situation in Minneapolis remains “incredibly dangerous,” governor says
The situation in Minneapolis remains “incredibly dangerous” as protests continue in the city, Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz said in a press conference early Saturday.

Multiple law enforcement authorities are responding to the unrest across the city, after a number of protesters ignored an 8 p.m. curfew set by the state government.

“This is the largest civilian deployment in Minnesota history that we have out there today,” Walz said.
The governor said officials cannot arrest people while they are trying to hold ground.

“This is an operation that has never been done in Minnesota,” Walz added.
Watch:

It was the site of a tense standoff between police and protesters, who threw projectiles and even a firework at law enforcement officials.

“This scene was chaotic. We saw at least two officers injured in clashes with demonstrators,” said CNN’s Nick Valencia, who was on the ground.

Denver mayor: “This violent distraction only divides us”

People fill the streets next to the Colorado state capitol on May 29 in Denver.
People fill the streets next to the Colorado state capitol on May 29 in Denver. Michael Ciaglo/Getty Images
Denver Mayor Michael Hancock has told of his sorrow over “needless, senseless and destructive” scenes as protests continue in the Colorado capital.

“Once again, the violent actions of a few are drowning out legitimate calls for justice. Twice today, we had peaceful, successful demonstration where people expressed their outrage over the death of #GeorgeFloyd,” Hancock said.
“We saw them, we heard them, and they respected their cause. Unfortunately, another element with selfish motives and reckless intentions infiltrated tonight’s demonstration and incited violence with homemade explosives, rocks, bottles, graffiti and vandalism.
“This is not who we are, and calmer heads must prevail. Our police officers have a sworn duty to maintain everyone’s safety – and they will. People are crying out to be heard, but this violent distraction only divides us.”
Police have deployed pepper balls in the city’s downtown area due to “civil disobedience,” authorities said.

There have been no reports on the number of arrests or damage in Denver so far.

Arrests in Minneapolis as protesters ignore curfew, dispersal orders
From CNN’s Chris Boyette

Minneapolis law enforcement officers have arrested a number of people who ignored dispersal orders in the area around the city’s 5th precinct, according to the state’s Department of Public Safety.

“Leave the Fifth Precinct area now so the troopers and officers on the ground can clear the area and enforce the curfew. 350 troopers and officers are in the area,” the department said in a tweet.

It comes as protesters ignored an 8 p.m. curfew imposed by the city.

CNN’s Sara Sidner said tear gas and rubber bullets have been used by police to try to disperse the crowd.

Hundreds of police have been advancing street by street toward the protesters, who have been creating barricades while chanting, “I can’t breathe.”

“We have heard people here say, ‘Look, we are not going to stop fighting about this right now,’ because they don’t feel that they’ve ever been heard enough and now they’ve just unleashed all emotions,” Sidner said from Minneapolis.

Shots fired at law enforcement officers in Minneapolis
From CNN’s Chris Boyette

The Minnesota Department of Public Safety says shots have been fired at law enforcement officers near the 5th precinct in Minneapolis.

In a Twitter post, the department said no troopers or officers were injured.

“Leave the area or you will be arrested,” the tweet said.

Shots have been fired at law enforcement officers near the Fifth Precinct during the operation. No troopers or officers have been injured. Leave the area or you will be arrested. #MACCMN

In a Twitter post, Johnson added that some people with “other agendas” had destroyed property.

“I understand the outrage, and I feel this pain deeply,” Johnson said. “What happened in Minneapolis is unacceptable. But please, remain peaceful.”

 

Everything on JUMIA

Leave a Reply

Please Login to comment
avatar
  Subscribe  
Notify of